Monday, November 4, 2013

Introducing Fine Art Rental


Introducing Art Rentals

Anderson Rentals is a pioneer in the equipment rental industry. Back in the 50s Raymond "Andy" Anderson along with some other Kansas City businessmen formed what would later become the American Rental Association, which today is one of the largest trade organizations in the world. Back then the goal was bringing professional grade quality equipment to homeowners and other markets, who had no choice but to buy. Today Anderson Rentals is pleased to introduce the availability of fine art in it's rental products that also were hereto only available in museums and high-end art galleries for purchase.


Renting Art

People rent art for many reasons. They may need art to stage for a special event or to attract buyers in a home sale. They may simply like the variety of renting instead of owning, or how much further their budget goes with rental instead of sales. Or they many find renting-to-own as their way to collect art. For this reason then we offer both short-term and long term rates, as well as rent-to-own programs. The most common reason for renting, among all types of art renters, is to have pieces rotating in and out of their space that enables them to spark up conversations with guests either on a continuous basis or just for special occasions at a lower cost.


Why Individuals Rent Art:
• People choosing art for their homes are often intimidated by the thought of making a major investment in art. Renting allows the customer to “try” before they buy. Want to check if your art matches your couch cushions? Rent it for a week and see. The vast majority of renters do end up purchasing but renting allows buyers to spread this cost out, afford more art, and allow them to fine tune their collection.
• Renting artwork allows home owners to have beautiful art in their home at any time (maybe they are staging their home for sale, or trying to impress visitors for a party, need ‘props’ for wedding pictures or family portraits, etc), and when they want a new look they can simply rent a different piece.
• Apartment renters and student housing residents like rental because their space may change frequently.
• As your taste change so can your art, or maybe you have limited space. Keep it at least 3 months at low LT rates and you can return it or swap it for new art. Just perfect for a new look each season of the year.
• Just got to have the original or commissioned piece but need to make payments, rent-to-own is for you.

Why Companies Rent Art:
• Many businesses are choosing art rentals instead of purchasing because it allows them to keep their decor fresh without having to invest a lot of money into new art.
• Changing the artwork regularly enables employers to set the tone of the room(s) depending on how they want to be seen by their clients or create an atmosphere for their employees.

Find out for yourself how practical and easy renting art is at MEA Fine Art.


Rental Terms

Weekly short term rates are available on giclee reproductions and art prints. The short-term rates are perfect for the special occasion, or just to take it home and see if it matches the couch. Selling your house? Fine art can make you listing inspiring but it also makes you memorable. Fine art is extremely memorable, people looking at open houses will get confused on which house had what features, but they’re sure to recall the one that had the great art. Are you having a wedding or family portrait taken? Dress up the occasion and your guests’ enjoyment with great art for the occasion. Fine Art is an amazing conversation starter. Even film makers commonly need art on a short-term rental basis. Because we are real fine artists and not just an internet brand, we can advise you on what art is suitable for you needs, and help make your event and space say what you mean and get noticed.

Long-term rates aren't really long-term, just 3 months, and available on original paintings as well as all prints and special orders. How you can rent original fine art at unbelievably low rates and after 3 months return it or swap it out for something new. Our rent to own rates on originals are even lower. Try it before you buy by renting. 50% of the rental fees paid can be applied against the purchase price. Fine turn your collection to perfection with the versatility of our rental programs.

Purchase prices for the originals, prints and merchandise available on the artwork are listed in the “add to cart” dropdowns on the artworks page. Rental rates posted are for a museum wrapped giclee reproduction on canvas, with solid black sides, in the size of the original artwork. The ST minimum weekly rate and LT 4-wks rates are for renting the reproduction. LT Rent-to-own rates on originals are 1/10th the purchase price.

Rentals can be converted into purchase at anytime. 50% of rental fees paid can be applied on up to 80% of purchase price at renter’s request. Purchase credits are not transferable between artworks. Conversions are not automatic or reversible after the fact. Although, we make every effort to notify renters if they have reached the 80% ceiling on purchase credits or qualify to convert the account to long-term rates (rentals > 4 wks), you are responsible for notifying us of any term changes you desire.

Paintings are photographed and condition noted with customer on renting. Customer is responsible for all losses, damages and liabilities on the artwork or other personal, private, or public property while out on rent (including transporting and hanging). Appropriate proof of insurance is required on all original and enhanced giclees, and recommended for all collectors.

A security deposit is required on all art rentals. Security deposits are higher the shorter the term. This is because the wear and tear damages, losses, costs, and risks are higher on ST frequently turned art. Security deposits on LT or RTO rentals are 25% of purchase cost, and abt 50% on ST rentals. Special orders (size and configurations not in stock) can require 3-5 weeks lead time. A 50% cancellation charge applies on all special orders. A full refund is issued on cancelation of in stock items prior to delivery or shipping. Early cancellation fees apply to LT and RTO contracts cancelled during the required term of 3 mos.

MEA Fine Art also accepts credit cards and PayPal financing is available on qualified purchases. Shipping or delivery charges are additional. Shipping is an actual cost and sites that offer free shipping have built this cost into their pricing; please call for shipping quotes as we are happy to work with you to reduce these costs. The shipping calculator on our website is the highest estimates of shipping. Actual shipping and handling charges will depend on your method of shipping desired. Call (785) 843-2044.

Saturday, November 2, 2013

New advances in printing technologies, bring fine art into everyone's reach.

Making Fine Art Available for Everyone.

Just about everyone loves art and recognizes how fine art is different and the personal connection you have with these one-of-a-kind artworks. The thrill of collecting your favorite artist is the same as the first car you bought with your own money when you were a kid. Years later you’ll still remember when you first saw it or who you were with. Because the artwork is a one-of-a-kind, it’s just yours. This is the joy of buying and gifting things you love.

Why buy Fine Art Prints?

But original fine art is costly. Without digital and printing technologies than in the past artists were limited to just selling originals. Because the entire artist’s cost and expenses had to be recovered in just a few sales a year, than they were very expensive. The more popular an artist got the more expensive their originals became because they were each hand painted custom pieces and therefore rare. For the novice collectors with small budgets, limited art knowledge and no appetite for the intimidating atmosphere at many established art galleries there were few options.

But with Giclee Art Reproductions, artist’s can now offer reproductions at a fraction of the original artwork. Producing Giclee art reproductions is a great way for artists to make their art more widely available at lower prices, and increasing their collector bases by offering affordable alternatives to more expensively priced originals. If someone loves a particular image, and the only way they can own it is by buying it in the form of a print or even as a t-shirt than that's absolutely OK. MEA Fine Art makes these new technology available to some of the best fine artists around the world so that contemporary fine art can now be available to anyone.

Technology has also increased buyers options. Buyers now have many choices in size and configuration of their art, and can order through POD(print-on-demand)services to best fit their available space and budget.

• Prices, are based on material cost not artist’s originals prices. MEA fine artists want to make their art available to even new collectors on a budget. No matter how expensive your favorite artist originals are for a limited time you can buy prints at a flat rate for all MEA artist. Collecting great art has never been so affordable. Now collecting even ‘blue chip’ artists is the same cost as an unknown but personal favorite. Discover your own taste in art with these affordable prints. This is the joy of art collecting or shopping; looking for that perfect piece. How you can afford to explore your taste in art with minimum investment risk. Do your own research and avoid the frustrating, confusing, and intimidating "talk" of high-end galleries? Take advantage of the special limited time offer of cost based pricing on our prints and merchandise to start building your collection with amazing values and your own style.
• Flat Rate pricing. We're serious about wanting to help new collectors experience the joy of collecting fine art, so we're currently pricing our giclee reproductions at flat rates for all artists (as opposed to the traditional way of basing pricing on the prices of the artist’s originals). MEA fine artists want to make their art available to even new collectors on a budget. No matter how expensive your favorite artist originals are for a limited time you can buy prints at a flat rate for all MEA artist. Collecting great art has never been so affordable.
• Lower investment risk.
• Configurations and POD selections
• Commercial uses (resale and licensing)


But the advances in digitizing and printing technologies has given us more than just inexpensive reproductions of fine art that are almost indistinguishable from the original. It has also led to a new original painting called an Enhanced Giclee. This is a print of the original painting on canvas that has been repainted by hand and signed by the original artist. Although pricing on Enhanced Giclee Originals is based on the artist labor rates, the artist is passing through to the buyer the inherent time saving obtained from current printing and digital technologies. Personalize customization is available; want the boy in the original painting to be a girl in your painting, or your signature bike painted into the shop scene? Then an Enhanced Giclee might be for you. In the end you have an original custom painting by your favorite artists for about ½ the price of an original work by that artist. And because it’s just yours and unique than it’s truly an original with the same feeling of connection and proud ownership that was hereto only available in original and limited editions offered through high-end galleries, auctions houses, and museums. Increase the collectibility of your art prints by having it enhanced into a brand new original or having it signed or personalized by the artist.

MEA Fine Art also uses advances in printing technologies to offer unique products based on artist original paintings. Think how amazing a wet bar or kitchen sink looks accented in custom ceramic tiles. MEA Fine Art is much more than just wall art. Use fine art anywhere you’d use any art. Fine art adds a richness and specialness to any card or merchandise. Don’t miss MEA Fine Art Collectibles - a unique line of artist designed gifts and ornaments. See how many ways we have for indulging your love of beauty.

If that’s not enough to get you to take the fine art plunge, than consider renting art. The most common reason for renting among all types of art renters is to have pieces rotating in and out of their space that enables them to spark up conversations with guests either on a continuous basis or just for special occasions at a lower cost. Why Individuals Rent Art:
• People choosing art for their homes are often intimidated by the thought of making a major investment in art. Renting allows the customer to “try” before they buy. Want to check if your art matches your couch cushions? Rent it for a week and see. The vast majority of renters do end up purchasing but renting allows buyers to spread this cost out, afford more art, and allow them to fine tune their collection.
• Renting artwork allows home owners to have beautiful art in their home at any time (maybe they are staging their home for sale, or trying to impress visitors for a party, need ‘props’ for wedding pictures or family portraits, etc), and when they want a new look they can simply rent a different piece.
• Apartment renters and student housing residents like rental because their space may change frequently.
• As your taste change so can your art, or maybe you have limited space. Keep it at least 3 months at low LT rates and you can return it or swap it for new art. Just perfect for a new look each season of the year.
• Just got to have the original or commissioned piece but need to make payments, rent-to-own is for you.
Why Companies Rent Art:
• Many businesses are choosing art rentals instead of purchasing because it allows them to keep their decor fresh without having to invest a lot of money into new art.
• Changing the artwork regularly enables employers to set the tone of the room(s) depending on how they want to be seen by their clients or create an atmosphere for their employees.

Friday, November 1, 2013

How is Fine Art Different Than Other Art?

How is fine art different than other art?

The line between 'fine art' and 'commercial art' is often hotly debated. Often these debates center on a subjective list of criteria that can be applied to a body of art and judged. Certainly there are such lists, it’s just that each “expert’s list” is different, but this doesn't mean that there isn't some commonality.

Four ways fine art is different.

1. Deeper and more unique interpretation. There have been many ways of describing that eye-catching quality of fine art but perhaps the simple “something you just love” describes it best. Fine art is a sharing of the human experience; it creates a connection with the viewer that is very personal, moving and memorable. From the moment you connect with a piece of art you start a unique connection, years later you will remember the first time you saw the painting, like the first time you heard a favorite song. You’ll remember who you were with and reconnect with what originally drew you. You might wonder about the artist and the meaning. You’ll associate your lives moments that the art was part of. All these connections, this increasing appreciation and involvement are the fine art difference.

Art is our companions in our minds; haunting melodies that are always in your heart. Your collection of fine art becomes a personal statement of your individuality and identity. It sooths you and creates your space. Others remember you by your art for a signature style. Every time someone admires your collection, it’s a personal affirmation of you too. It’s that restorative and reaffirming connection.

2. Master artists are trained and experienced artists. Fine artists are working artists. In all things, including art, there is a road to proficiency that will hone and challenge the artists to reach the limits of their talent. The methods of development will vary (some artists are self-taught, some are college educated) but there is a sincere dedication to ethical growth and artistic improvement built on long records of practice and achievements.

3. Not commercially created. By this I mean two things:
a. That the work is not created solely for commercial or fad goals. That the artist’s motivation was providing that “deeper and more unique interpretation” and not just something that will sell or is popular. This is the basis behind the stereotype that a fine artist must live like a monk and produce art untainted by consumer demand. But an artist must be part of life in order to interpret it, and the success or failure at obtaining a fine art status rest in the actual paintings under consideration not in the lifestyle of the artist.
b. What I don’t mean is that fine art must be a certain discipline or substrate, like a painting and not a photograph or a t-shirt. It’s not the substrate that art is on that defines whether it’s fine art, or the type of artists (photographer, painter, sculpture, etc.), but it does mean that there was an original artist that makes a unique original work. The work was not made from kits or other artists work, and is produced in limited quantities on exclusive original designs.

4. Collectable and Archival
Many factors will influence the value of an individual piece of art and the collectibility of an artist. But in order to be collectible than an artist’s must have gotten their work out there, had it seen and a reputation established. Besides being working artists than fine artists often participate in juried shows and contest, and hold active memberships in professional organizations and acclaimed art guilds. You might not understand what an art judge sees in a particular artists work but you can understand that it’s between the artists that entered the contest. Likewise, you might not understand why an artist is popular, but you do understand that you see it everywhere. If the artist, you’re collecting isn't out there working on building a reputation, than it’s unlikely that the collectibility of their work will increase.

Collectible art also requires archival methods and materials involved in creating the artwork to ensure longevity for the work. Only quality materials and substrates are used. Collectible work will be passed down for generations, and with proper care will stay beautiful indefinitely.

Collecting fine art is the ultimate personal statement. New technologies have made collecting fine art more affordable and versatile than ever before. Giclee reproductions are almost indistinguishable from the original, and at a fraction of the cost of original work. Having the entire collection of your favorite artist's works is now possible for all. Signed and dated prints are highly collectible, and enhanced giclees are custom new originals. Nor are you limited by size and configuration of the original or just to wall art. Wallpapers, ceramic tiles, apparel, even cards and stationary don't have to be limited to mass produced choices. Fine art is available today on almost every substrate but was first created as a unique fine art original (even if the original is digital) that succeeds in connecting with the viewer. Bringing the deeper connection that you have with fine art into all aspects of your life has never been more possible.

Defining your home and business with affordable, collectible and unique original fine art by contemporary (living) artists is new and exciting. Artists don't have to be dead to be collectible; contemporary artists with growing reputations are both the most appreciable but also your personal discoveries.

DISCOVER THE FINE ART DIFFERENCE! MEA Fine Art Website:


Online AW Gallery

Artist’s Designed Merchandise Store Links:
Zazzle
Spoonflower

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

MEA Fine Art Collectibles

Making fine art available to everyone is a mutual goal of MEA Fine Art artists. So we challenged our artists to design a unique line of one-of-a-kind gifts and ornaments for the 2013 holiday season and are proud to announce MEA Fine Art Collectibles.

Master artists have recreated the charm, variety, and skill lost in the mass production process and with these wonderfully unique designs and original fine art. An artist's eye can capture so much more than a machine or camera. Art should be personal and individual, and now it can be. Each gift comes gift boxed with a Certificate of Authenticity. New works are arriving daily, and commissioned work is still being accepted for the holiday season. We don't get every piece posted on the web so call or come by our gallery for current selections. Check back regularly or follow us on social media as new pieces are posted.

MEA Fine Art are licensed artist with the University of Kansas and is offering its first ever 2013 KU Christmas Tree Ornament for all our Jayhawk fans. On one side the WWI memorial campanile against a striking KU blue winter sky. On the other side the Jayhawk logo (see Jayhawk Christmas below).

Each ornament is an original unique piece of art and a truly special keepsake and collectible. Comes in a stunning gift box with a Certificate of Authenticity.

4" diameter glass or plastic ball. Custom, personalized, and commissioned work available. See website for all ornaments and gifts by MEA Fine Art Artists.

Start making fine art a part of your style, with truly unique designs and products by master artists. MEA Fine Art is more than a traditional gallery selling originals. The gallery has teamed with different POD (print on demand) services to offer a wide range of products based on our artists professional and award winning work. Our Giclee reproductions are the finest quality and produced in North America. Collecting fine art has never been such a value, so versatile, and so affordable.

Please note: Photography doesn't do justice to these beautiful ornaments, due to distortion of curved surface and reflection.

Please join us at the Maple Leaf Festival in Baldwin City, KS on October 19 & 20, 2013. MEA Fine Art is proud to be a part of this annual historic fair. Artists will be present during the fair, so we welcome you to come by and browse. Our booth is located in the school gym. We will also be introducing our latest gallery artist, Monty Sneegas latest line of benches, tables, and home furnishings.

Monday, October 7, 2013

Anderson Rentals, Inc. - Ornament - Jayhawk Christmas

Start off the holiday season with this wonderful hand-painted original ornament by MEA Fine Art. Sure to please every Jayhawk fan, comes wrapped in stunning gift box with Certificate of Authenticity. Anderson Rentals, Inc. - Ornament - Jayhawk Christmas

Monday, July 15, 2013

WIP - Historical event art - Quantrill's Raid

Occasionally then I do story paintings. In this case the eyewitness account by my ancestors of Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, KS on August 21, 1863 that sparked off the American Civil War.

Conceptualizing:
Conceptualizing a scene you've never witnessed is a challenge. Finding that single iconic image that will incorporate the event. I start very similarly to a writer in that I start putting together a visual outline of my story. I list or sketch out the characters, location, date, etc. that I know about the event. It is from these sketches that I determine perspective (view), size of canvas, and importance of elements in the painting. Photography Prints

background - Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, KS on August 21, 1863. This event became part of "Bleeding Kansas" which triggered the American Civil War. This painting is the rendering of my ancestors eye-witness account of the raid. Although to young to fight the boy is drafted by the local freight wagon driver to leave his boyhood behind and take over the duties of delivering the freight so the driver can help and fight his neighbors in this guerrilla war. The deep ideological differences that erupted in violence on this day and split the nation still exist in the people today.

In this sketch you can see the wagon and people, Lawrence, KS in the background, etc. This sketch will mean little to anyone but the artist, but it really is critical in keeping your focused on your vision.



Art Prints References:
References like this map of Lawrence, KS in 1869 are very helpful. This is close to the view of Lawrence I used. I want to be historically accurate as possible for this paint. This event took place at dawn, at specific location. Landmarks in existence today will be different then in 1863. What did the clothing, vehicles, landscape look like. What technology wasn't invented yet, like barbed-wire, metal buckets, guns, etc. There is little photographic records of this event and period. Paintings and drawings are interpretations, and are not necessarily accurate. The more research you do the more richer both the painting and your artistic experience.









Art Prints Perspective:
Starting with a blank canvas I just place and size my sketches in accordance with the image in my head. Perspective is my focus. Get everything to fit on the canvas with some plan to compensate for required disproportionality (sometime you intend to make things bigger than life). As I develop individual elements I have to pose them in relation to the viewer's perspective, but at this time I'm just fine with stick-figures and area outlines. It's critical that you transfer your planned perspective.









Photography Prints Composition:
Now that I have the basics of my story (raid, kid, fright driver),I start developing elements. Artwise the sky is the most important single element in my painting because it will establish my color palette and establish my light source. The sky is the interactive artistic element that unites the story elements in the painting. It will unite the scene; the background clouds, the middle ground smoke, and the foreground tree are all in the same sky. The sky is revisited later in the creation process as it creates the mood and drama of the painting. But at this time my colors are anything that is close in the box. I work on the unity first and then colors. In this painting sky is also an important story element as the raid happened at dawn.







Sell Art Online Telling the Story
After I've placed my horizon and my basic characters, then I start adding outlines of elements that I need to tell my story. Why are the characters there and what are they doing? I don't worry about colors, detail, pose, or anything else but composition placement. At this point most paintings (including this one) start taking on their own personalities; how you imagined it would look is different than it does. It's this painting personality that ends up determining my other mechanics: color, pose, etc.












Art Prints Light:
At this point than most of my story elements are incorporated and I start thinking about light. Light is essential in my painting (or any painting)to establish mood and drama. I want an epic feel to this painting. Color mixing is an art in itself. Color and light are normally developed in overlays of glazes and paint. Color, light and mood foundations are started here but will be continually developed as the painting progresses.













Sell Art Online Pose:
We have establish the story elements but now we have to pose them. How are the characters in my painting able to convey action and reaction? This is a detail of my original compilation sketch; how the element would look to the paintings viewer. In this sketch then the figures are climbing into the wagon. By the time I was working on canvas (see pose 2) I had already changed the positions of the figures. Eventually then the pose of the figures also changes in order to focus the story. I want to portray more defense than aggression, so I lowered the driver's arm and changed his pose. The boy is barefoot and doing chores (youth and naivety). As I research costume then figures will change; I have the antique shotgun that research shows is more likely the driver carried to use as a model, rather then a sword. Pose is determined both by the viewers perspective but also the required communication with the action of the story (get your faces looking where they should).




Photography Prints Story:
I've added elements to enhance the story. A dropped bucket of chicken feed tells why the boy was there and portrays the change in life (chores are abandoned for adult work). Likewise the driver is laying down his whip and taking up arms. As you fill in elements in historical work then you need to research each element you add. Barbed wire fencing was not yet available, horse tack, landmarks, clothing, tools, weapons, etc. will all need to be research.


At this point then I'm about 1/3 the way through the painting process. The story line, scene, light, etc. are all established and just need to be developed. But you should now have a good idea of where I'm trying to go with this painting. It's still too early to see if I can pull off the image I'm trying for, but check back for updates.




Sell Art Online Update1 - Shadows
Pose and shadow work to emphasize dawns streaking light and bring eye-movement and a sense of action into painting. Color and detail is developing in overlays. Light is used to highlight abandoned chores and figures.















Art Prints


Details
Scenes within scenes, detail. Detail is built in layers. Here you can see I have started adding fine detail like expression, and costume detail to my figures. Have started adding a tarp to wagon and changed the sword into a shotgun (or will be, takes a few layers). Details add interest and story to painting.











Art Prints
Detail2 - Lawrence Burning
Continuing to work on my details; here the burning of the city of Lawrence, I intentionally use different disciplines in my sub-scenes to more closely interact like natural sight. Here an abstract of the burning city allows detail to be created by the viewer, while still appearing impressionistic in the overall painting.

The realistic foreground is countered against the abstract with impressionistic work. Disciplines are mixed to give maximum utilization of the painting to provide different views (sub-pictures), eye-movement, and natural perspective.

In the impressionistic middle-ground, then known landmarks of the period are added; the planning for the University of Kansas (scaffolded building), the windmill, Railroad bridge, Ferry, Plymouth Congregational Church, chalk quarry and other geography of the area.





Art Prints
Mood and Drama An overall view of the details so far. Lot's more detail to finish but I'm now shifting my focus to mood and drama. When developing details I focus more on developing the mood, and drama of the scene and in getting the elements to look seated, then I do on tiny detail. I can't get an overall epic proportionality of the event if I rely only on impossible to see detail to tell my story. Even if the paintings viewer can't see the expression on the drivers face or bodies of people in the town from a distance, I still want them to have the overall impact first. Details fill out the painting and reward interested views, but are just intended to be the lyrics not the melody of the painting.








The Finish: This isn't my HR scan (still waiting for paint to dry) but thought I'd add title and descriptions that will be on original.



Photography Prints
Title: Bleeding Kansas - A life and Nation Changing Event
Oil on Canvas, 28" x 34" (unframed)
Artist: Mary Ellen Anderson
Original and Prints available for sale Online Gallery

This painting is inspired from the oral history that has been passed down in my family of my ancestor's eyewitness account of Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, Kansas during the American Civil War. I have endeavored to be as geographically and historically accurate as possible, while still taking the necessary artistic license to tell the story.

At dawn on August 21, 1863, 12 year old David Anderson's life and world changed forever when war came to his home, just outside of Lawrence, Kansas. Although too young to fight in the guerrilla war that became known as "Bleeding Kansas", David was drafted by the local freight man to take over his delivery route, so that the driver could fight in this war of neighbor against neighbor.

Leaving his childhood behind, David climbed into the freight wagon and in an actual 'rites of passage' successfully delivered his cargo to Salt Lake City, Utah. This triumphant arrival occurred just as the local Methodists minister's daughter was crossing the street and young David was immediately smitten. Her name was Rose and David called her his "Rose of the Valley". One thing leads to another and the former Irish Catholic boy returned home a man, with a new career (freight driver), a new bride and a new religion, changing forever not only his life but the lives of all his decedents including myself.

War changes all of us forever but rarely in the way we expect. Ideological differences that you assume war will settle still exist today and are even compounded by the scars of events like this raid. But inevitably in war boyhoods are lost, and futures are changed forever.

--Mary Ellen Anderson
WIP fb gallery on this painting: http://tinyurl.com/lve3pwa.

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Selling and Buying Art - Does your wall art match your sofa pillows?

Selling and Buying Art - Does your wall art match your sofa pillows? Art Prints


Often time’s artists and gallery staff scoff at decorators that want art that matches their sofa pillows. It seems so silly that someone would want to furnish and decorate a room around a $20 throw pillow, but that’s not what’s going on here. That pillow represents the decorator’s artistic view. A decorator is creating a new original artwork, the actual room or setting. That pillow is a memory-aid to this work-in-progress. It keeps the decorator focused on the colors, themes, space and light of their vision.

Artists that fail to understand the true needs of the decorators are missing an opportunity to serve them. As artists, most of us love collaborations on our works-in-progress. We're all more receptive to advice and change during the creation process, and so are decorators. Decorators as artists have the same creative spirit as painters, photographers, or any other artists. They want to explore their medium, be creative, and get feedback. Help them wade through the overwhelming selection of artwork, frames, etc. that are available to them. Help them avoid the newbie or common mistakes. These can be great opportunities to get a following and for custom or commissioned work. Even the decorator may not be used to thinking of themselves as an artist. Help them see that artist in themselves and what they are really looking for; it’s more than a color match.

Sofa pillows should make you excited because someone is going to show you a WIP. Try to understand it just as you would any other piece of art; ask questions and get involved in their vision (did they take any cell-phone pictures of the space?). Treat pillow-carrying decorators as you would want your own artistic efforts treated; with respect and appreciation. Even if your work doesn't have a place in this particular WIP, then just the understanding you show for that decorator’s vision will bring them back the next time. It also gives your real insight into what’s selling. Decorators are artistic peers; as artists their visions is MORE valid then yours because it’s their artwork. As a professional, you offer your experience to help them achieve that vision, not defeat it. If you talk someone into something they hate then they (and anyone who listens to them) will never come back.

But here is the final reason why you want your art to match the sofa pillow, because just as the pillow is the overall connector on the WIP stage, then your art will hopefully become that connector to the finished project. It is you art that now says what the space is about, and connects the furnishings; your physical art has replaced what was just an artistic vision in the decorators mind into a new original work that’s incomplete without it.